Soil Temperatures

Soil temperatures have been steadily warming since late March at Hort Farm No. 2 (North Brunswick). Temperatures consistently ran above 50 degree Fahrenheit in early April, and between 50 and 60 degrees from 10 to 27 April.

May 1st was the fifth consecutive day of the maximum soil temperature reaching at least 65 degrees. Thus, soil temperatures are essentially entering into an ‘ideal’ period for the growth of cool-season turfgrasses.

Those experienced with managing summer patch may recall that 5 consecutive days with a soil temperature maximum of 65 degrees is the threshold for initiating a preventive summer patch control program. Isn’t it ironic that ideal growth of the fungus that causes summer patch is synchronized with ideal growth temperatures for cool-season turfgrasses.

Damage from summer patch disease, however, typically is not seen until later in the summer when heat and drought stresses make it challenging for plants with a compromised root system to survive.

summer patch disease on hard fescue

Severe summer patch disease on hard fesuce at Hort Farm No. 2 in July 2013.

Some Early Disease Activity

Sorry no pictures for this post, but thought I would share some recent observations. The recent rains and warm night on Friday/Saturday brought out two diseases on annual bluegrass earlier than we typically experience at the research farm in North Brunswick NJ (Hort Farm No. 2).

Saturday morning, our graduate student found nickel- to quarter-sized spots of foliar Pythium on his annual bluegrass plots. Tended to be more spots on his plots with greater N fertility but the disease was also on low N plots. This is the earliest I have experienced foliar Pythium, but the Friday/Saturday nighttime temperature didn’t get much below 65 degrees F, ‘good’ for Pythium.

Also on annual bluegrass, was a slight outbreak of dollar spot on Saturday morning. Dollar spot in April is early but not unheard of in NJ.

You might notice that the pests mentioned have shown up first on annual bluegrass.

Warm Air, Cool Soil

Warm air temperatures build anticipation of plant growth but keep in mind that cool soil temperatures will strongly moderate growth during the spring. Turf growth typically will be very slow until [Read more…]

Winter Damage

 

snow plow damage

Sod pieces removed by snow plowing.

While the warm weather has allowed many of us to get out and enjoy the outdoors, you may have noticed [Read more…]

Weather Ideal for Pythium and Brown Patch

The weather this summer has been very conducive for brown patch and Pythium blight diseases. I have received number requests this summer to address turf problems related to one or both of these diseases in lawns, sports fields, sod and now my own plots.

Suspected initial outbreak of Pythium on velvet bentgrass maintained at a 0.110-inch height that occurred over the weekend (August 7) in a cultivation trial at Hort Farm No. 2 in North Brunswick NJ.

Suspected initial outbreak of Pythium on velvet bentgrass maintained at a 0.110-inch height that occurred over the weekend (August 7) in a cultivation trial at Hort Farm No. 2 in North Brunswick NJ.

The weather forecast for the rest of this week indicates [Read more…]

Licensing for Mosquito Control – Category 8B

I have been getting questions from landscape/turf professionals about licensing for mosquito control. I asked Dr. George Hamilton about where to direct professionals with these questions.

Information on licensing of professionals for mosquito control can be found on the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Pest Management website: http://pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/PAT/

You can get a core manual and category 8B manual at your county extension office.

Killing Freezes… Finally

Many people are pleased that typical winter temperatures have taken so long to show up. Below are some interesting observations from early- to mid-winter in New Brunswick.

Relatively warm soil temperatures (as high as mid-60s °F) stimulated growth late into December.

Dandelion bloom on 15 December 2015 in New Brunswick.

Dandelion bloom on 15 December 2015 in New Brunswick.

Had to remove cover (folded up in behind Kyle Genova) from our K-Microdochium Patch trial so that it could be mowed on 16 December 2016!

Removed the permeable growth cover (folded up behind Kyle Genova) from our K-Microdochium Patch trial to mow it on 16 December 2016!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter flush of seedheads on annual bluegrass

Annual bluegrass can go to seed about anytime of the year but this is a first for me — lots of annual bluegrass seedheads on 28 December 2015 in New Brunswick.

 

 

 

 

 

Kyle Genova pulled back permeable turf cover to inspect annual bluegrass growth and progress of the Microdochium Patch inoculation on 28 December 2015. Turf is still growing and disease is expanding.

Kyle Genova pulled back the permeable turf cover from the K-Microdochium Patch trial on 28 December 2015. The annual bluegrass was still growing enough to schedule another mowing. And the progress of the Microdochium Patch inoculation was expanding (good for the research but ugly!). No disease response to potassium at this point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odd to find weed species that are normally gone by this time of the year. Killing frosts/freezes are finally here and frost sensitive plants should be damaged and won’t persist much longer. Cool-season turfgrasses will transition into dormancy if freezing temperatures linger for a while. But it won’t be too long (66 days until spring, 20 March) before annuals like prostrate knotweed will germinate and start to emerge from bare soil areas.

Freeze Injury on Weeds

Don’t recall prostrate knotweed (annual) persisting into January. But freezing temperatures have finally killed the knotweed. Also note that the leaves of broadleaf plantain (perennial) have just now been frost damaged.

 

Kyllinga Awakens as Soil Temps Increase

Daily high soil temperatures at the 2-inch depth are consistently getting into the 60s °F. Yesterday, temperatures in sunny locations reached into the upper 60s. This means that the warm-season species are, or will be soon waking from winter slumber.

Leaf tips emerging from rhizomes of kyllinga on 15 April 2015 in central New Jersey.

Leaf tips emerging from rhizomes of kyllinga on 15 April 2015 in central New Jersey.

For the last three weeks, I have been watching the emergence of false green kyllinga (Kyllinga gracillima). Most sites infested with kyllinga are probably showing active shoot growth. So it appears that kyllinga needs soil temperatures that reach consistently into the 60s to emerge from winter dormancy. As temperatures continue to warm, re-growth of kyllinga should accelerate.

False green kyllinga is a perennial sedge species with well-developed rhizomes (underground lateral spreading stems). Kyllinga is relatively low growing so it [Read more…]

Looks Like Grass… But It Isn’t

Other than today and yesterday, soil temperatures in New Brunswick have been reaching into the lower 50s °F during the last week or so. And you see the effects, some plants are finally awakening from winter slumber. Cool-season turfgrasses are slowly greening up. Tree buds are swelling, some are flowering. Forsythia is just starting to bloom. And prostrate knotweed, one of the earliest germinating summer annual weeds, is emerging.

Prostrate knotweed is frequently found invading [Read more…]

Winterkill on Annual Bluegrass: Don’t Skip the K

We lost the ice cover on our Poa annua trials two weekends ago (March 7-8th) and initially the turf looked okay. But now… it doesn’t. And it will probably get worse, if we are reading the symptoms correctly.

Blotchy, tan-colored plots and borders around this potassium trial are suffering from winterkill. Photo taken 15 March 2015. Healthier looking turf has received K fertilization; dying turf has not.

Blotchy, tan-colored plots and borders around this potassium trial are suffering from winterkill. Green, healthier looking turf received K fertilization; dying turf did not. (15 March 2015)

Last Friday (March 13), my graduate student, Chas Schmid, informed me that I needed to look at his potassium trial on our Poa annua turf. There was a huge difference between no-K and K fertilized plots. The no-K plots have steadily lost green color and become very blotchy. Plants taken from those plots are water-soaked and feel mushy when squeezed (How is that for a scientific description?). Dr. Lindsey Hoffman has a lot of experience with winterkill on Poa annua in Massachusetts and she is convinced that many of the plants are dead. And it smells like it – silage on a dairy farm!

Take home for me – don’t let your Poa annua turf become potassium deficient! Chas’ data for suppressing anthracnose severity indicates that a soil test (Mehlich 3) ≥50 ppm K and a tissue level of ≥2% K in the clippings are indicators that the K level is good. And winterkill in March 2015 hasn’t changed my mind about that data!

Looks like this might be the end of this Poa annua field. Dr. William Meyer said, “Good riddance.”