Summer Aeration/Cultivation/Venting

Aeration during the summer can be a helpful practice but does need some caution. Many turf managers performing mid-season aeration on putting greens will be using needle tines, which are less disruptive. But the key words are [Read more…]

Glyphosate Alternatives

Recent news about glyphosate has many thinking about alternatives.

Joe Neal (Professor of Weed Science, Extension Specialist & Department Extension Leader Horticultural Science) and Andrew Senesac (Extension Weed Scientist Cornell Cooperative Extension, Suffolk Co., NY) have published a thorough summary of alternatives and the associated pros and cons through NC State Extension at https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/are-there-alternatives-to-glyphosate-for-weed-control-in-landscapes

Green-up Transitioning to Growth: Ready to Mow?

Three weeks ago, many turfgrasses began greening up as surface soil temperatures warmed into the 50s °F during the day. Currently, surface soil temperatures are reaching into the 60s °F during the day, which stimulates vertical leaf growth especially after a rain. Any early spring N fertilization will also encourage vertical leaf growth.

Accordingly, mowing equipment should be reconditioned and ready for routine use. Setup of mowing height should not be overlooked; an incorrect mowing height will lead to problems. Generally, lawn grasses will be easier to maintained at a mowing height of 3-inches or higher.

Grasses will be healthier when there are more leaves (leaf area) to capture sunlight for photosynthesis and shade the soil surface. More photosynthesis helps the grass grow more roots and a shaded soil surface remains cooler. Shade also blocks the exposure of weed seed to light, which is an environmental trigger for weed germination.

Uneven ground is another reason to recommend relatively high mowing. Many lawns are relatively uneven. A lack of smoothness in a lawn contributes to poor mowing.  A mower set 3-inches helps protect high spots in a lawn from being severely scalped. For example, a high spot in a lawn that ends up being cut at 2-inches with a mower set at 3-inches would be cut at 1-inch if the mower were set at 2-inches.

Mower scalp caused by mower deck being set too low on a lawn with uneven ground.

 

Soil Health

Soil that has been severely compacted often breaks into large massive plates.

For those interested in soil health – we all should be – the Soil Health Institute has release a 60-minute documentary featuring innovative farmers and soil health experts from throughout the U.S.

You can view the film at https://livingsoilfilm.com/

 

Dog Days and Cool-Season Grass

 

Cool-season lawn struggling to grow in shallow soil on a south-facing slope during dog days.

According to Merriam-Webster, dog days is the period between early July and early September when the hot sultry weather of summer usually occurs in the northern hemisphere; a period of stagnation or inactivity.

The dog is actually the Dog Star – also called Sirius – which rises simultaneously with the sun during the hottest days of summer in the northern hemisphere. Plutarch (Greek writer, 46-120 AD) referred to the hot days of summer as hēmerai kynades (literally, “dog days”); the Latin translation dies caniculares is the source of our English phrase. But I digress…

You most likely have noticed that cool-season grasses have recently entered a period of stagnation or inactivity (dog days) and, in some cases, are spent. The hot summer days have steadily increased soil temperatures to the point that the soil is now warmer than air temperature for much of the daylight hours and all of the night. During the last 10 days at Hort Farm No. 2, soil temperature at 3-inches has oscillated between 76 and 90 °F and at 2-inches 78 and 92 °F. These soil temperatures are well above the optimum temperatures for root growth and clearly explain why cool-season grasses are lethargic at this time.

What to do? Be patient and do not “push” the grass. This is not the time of year to stress out turf – the grass has very little resiliency and will not tolerate much abuse or recovery quickly. I recently witnessed utility vehicle traffic on subtly drought stressed turf during the hottest part of the day result in classic tire-track damage. Root systems of cool-season grasses are weakest and shallowest at this time of year. Thus, localized drought stress can develop rapidly – within a couple hot, sunny days – during the dog days.

These cultural practices can be helpful in getting high value turf to survive dog days. Once the turf has drained after drenching thunderstorms (2-3 days), program daily, very-light (50-65% of reference ET), deficit irrigation using a rainhold setting (such as 0.2-inch rain) to stop irrigation from adding to over-wetting from storms. Deficit irrigation assures that thunderstorms will be the reason for excess wetness, not the irrigation schedule. This irrigation plan should encourage the turf the dry without over-drying between irrigations (or thunderstorms). If excess drying does occur with this irrigation plan, it probably will start in highly localized (small) areas, which can be effectively managed with well-timed syringing to re-hydrate dry leaves and prevent crispy thatch during the heat of the day. Crispy thatch means that surface adventitious roots either are or will soon be crispy as well. Moist to dry thatch is good, whereas crispy and crunchy thatch in the heat is bad. Weekly, low-rate fertilization (N and possibly P, K and micronutrients) is crucial on sand-topdressed and sand-based rootzones commonly found on golf course putting greens and some sports turfs. These rootzones have very little mineralization capacity to supply essential nutrients during dog days. Weekly low-rate fertilization provides a steady, consistent slow-growth and avoids the “surge-crash” cycle of growth that results from less-frequent and higher application rates. Typically, low-rate N is no more than a 0.1-lbs. per 1,000-sq. ft.

Summer Patch on Hard Fescue

Hot weather in early July brought on some severe summer patch (root disease) symptoms in hard fescue. This disease on fine fescues hasn’t been as thoroughly studied as it has been on other grasses.  So recommendations are based on knowledge learned in Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) and annual bluegrass (Poa annua) turfs. We are establishing plots this summer and fall to learn more about this disease on hard fescue.

Symptoms of summer patch disease on a 4-year-old hard fescue turf in New Brunswick NJ.

Fine fescues are better adapted to dry and infertile soils. Summer performance of fine fescue will generally be better in moderate to light shade than full sun.

To limit damage from summer patch on fine fescues, do not apply more than 2 lbs. of N per 1,000 sq. ft. per year. An acidifying form of N such as ammonium sulfate is thought to be the best choice when fertilizing fine fescues affected by summer patch. Caution is needed when irrigation fine fescue turf, especially on heavy (loamy) soils. Summer patch disease tends to be more severe on soil that retains water. Irrigation should be applied in a manner that moistens the soil after some time of drying but does not keep the soil excessively wet for many days. Mow fine fescue turf no lower than 2.5 to 3 inches and stop mowing when the turf shows symptoms of heat and drought stress in the summer. Fine fescue turf grows more slowly than other cool-season turfgrasses especially when air temperatures approach and exceed 90 °F.

See Dr. Bruce Clarke’s PowerPoint slides for more details on summer patch disease.

 

Managing Thatch

Recently received a couple of questions about managing thatch.

One question was concerning the recent trend in the industry to not core putting greens and only use solid tines. 

Non-coring programs rely on topdressing to dilute the organic matter (thatch) that accumulates, thus forming a mat layer as opposed to a thatch layer. Turgeon defines mat as a tightly intermingled layer composed of [Read more…]

Cadmium and Phosphate Fertilizer Debated in EU

Fertilizer derived from phosphate rock, which naturally contains cadmium, is being debated in the European Union. More than half the cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, in some agricultural soils originated from phosphate rock derived fertilizer. Sedimentary phosphate rock mined in northern Africa contains naturally high cadmium levels. Phosphate from mines of igneous rock in Russia has much lower levels.  Read more…

Rectangles of Melting Snow

Made an interesting observation while inspecting this trial for geese damage last December; rectangular plots of snow melting faster than other plots. Not sure of ramifications, but snow cover on some treatments was melted or melting faster compared to other treatments. This trial has numerous combinations of topdressing sands and rates as well as hollow tine cultivation. The treatments with a drier surface were retaining snow cover longer than treatments that tend to retain more water in the surface 0- to 3-inches.

Rectangular areas of melted/melting snow on this research (putting green) trial are treatments that have greater water retention in the surface 0- to 3-inches.

Winter Salt

At seminar lectures discussing the effects of turf fertilizer on water quality, I am often asked about the impact of de-icing salts on water quality. A recent article on winter road salt indicates that freshwater rivers are becoming saltier and more alkaline. Click here to read the article.

‘White soil’ along roadside indicates severe salt accumulation from winter de-icing.